Course code ESPCI1
Course title Energy
Institution Ecole Supérieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielles de Paris
Course address ESPCI Paris, 10 rue Vauquelin, 75005
City Paris
Minimum year of study 4th year
Minimum level of English Good
Minimum level of French None
Key words

The discoveries of the eighteenth century (the steam engine), the nineteenth century (the combustion engine), that of electricity and then that of the Internet of objects have increased our total consumption in energy. This latter has become enormous, exceeding 1,21014 kWh/year, which corresponds to a power of around 14 Tera-Watts. In 2050, this power is estimated at 28 TW.

The primary energy used in the word comes from 82% fossil energy (coal, gas and oil), the rest from renewable energies (sun, wind, sea and other) and nuclear power at 11% and 7% respectively.These figures vary from country to country, as 34% of primary energy comes from nuclear power in France, while 64% comes from coal in China. These fossil energies are not inexhaustible. Moreover, their use causes high CO2 emissions, which are the cause of global warming. Nuclear power can not be a solution for the future.

It is thus important to look at the efficient use of renewable energies with a low carbon footprint - solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, etc. -, which are clean and inexhaustible energies.

Various promising avenues of research on energy conversion are currently being pursued. They consist, among other things, in transforming solar energy into different vectors, which are (1) electricity, by photovoltaic conversion, (2) hydrogen, by photo-catalysis / electrolysis reactions, making use of properties of semiconductor junctions / liquids to dissociate water in H2 and O2, in converting wind energy in electricity and in harvesting the energy around us (vibrations, Wifi waves, thermal gradient).

A difficulty, inherent in renewable energies (solar, wind or other), rests on their intermittence, which causes large fluctuations of delivered energy, because, of course, neither the wind blows nor the sun shines on command. It is therefore imperative to invent new energy storage technologies that can adapt to network applications in order to better manage the renewable energy resources of our planet, that is to say capable of delivering energy when you need it.

In this week we will be interested in these themes.

Language English
Professor responsible Annie Colin
Telephone +33 1 40 79 46 57
Fax
Email annie.colin@espci.fr
Participating professors Teaching Team:

BOCQUET Lyderic, Research Director, ENS [Sessions #1]

HADZIIOANNOU Georges, Professor University of Bordeaux [Session #2]

STEVENS Philippe, Industrial Speaker EDF [Session #3]

CASSIR Michel, Professor ENSCP [Session #4]

SERRE Christian, Professor ESPCI-ENS [Session #5]

COLIN Annie, Professor ESPCI [Session #6]

LARCHER Dominique, Professor LRCS, Amiens [Session #7]

Number of places Minimum: 20, Maximum: 30, Reserved for local students: 0
Objectives

Monday, March 19: The first course (Lydéric Bocquet ENS 1:20) will be an introduction to the problems of energy and will pose the questions of order of magnitude. This course will be offered in the form of a MCQ (not evaluated) in order to show the students good or bad ideas about the problem.

The second course (2x1H20) will focus on photovoltaics (Gorges Hadziioannou Bordeaux).

Tuesday 20 March: The morning will be devoted to the wind (2x1h20 in EDF contact P Steevens).

In the afternoon the course (2x1H20 Michel Cassir ENSCP) will focus on hydrogen and hydrogen storage materials.

Wednesday 21 March: The morning will be devoted to the MOF and their applications for energy (C.Serre ENS-ESPCI 1H20). The afternoon will focus on materials for the conversion of mechanical energy into electrical energy (2x1h20) (Annie Colin ESPCI)

Thursday, March 22: The day will focus on the batteries (Dominique Larcher Amiens 3x1H20).

Friday, March 23: The morning will be devoted to the test and the afternoon to the visit of laboratories.

Programme to be followed

Agenda:

Monday, March 19                

09:00am – 09:30am: Presentation of ESPCI Paris (Amphitheater HOLWECK – building C – ground floor)

(Amphitheater BOREAU – building C – 1st floor)

10:00 am – 12:00 am: Session #1 “Energy, Orders of Magnitude Quizz”, BOCQUET Lyderic, Research Director, ENS

2:00 pm – 5:00 pm: Session #2 “Photovoltaics”, HADZIIOANNOU Georges, Professor University of Bordeaux

 

Tuesday, March 20 (Amphitheater BOREAU – building C – 1st floor)

9:30 am – 12:30 am: Session #3 “Eolian Energy”, STEVENS Philippe, Industrial Speaker EDF

2:00 pm – 5:00 pm: Session #4 “Hydrogen”, CASSIR Michel, Professor ENSCP

 

Wednesday, March 21 (Amphitheater BOREAU – building C – 1st floor)

9:00 am – 12:00am: Session #5 “Porous Materials (M.O.F) for Energy”, SERRE Christian, Professor ESPCI-ENS

2:00 pm – 5:00 pm: Session #6: “Conversion of Mechanical Vibration into Energy”, COLIN Annie, Professor ESPCI

         

Thursday, March 22 (Amphitheater BOREAU – building C – 1st floor)

9:00 am –11:30 am: Session #7 “Energy Storage”, LARCHER Dominique, Professor LRCS, Amiens

2:30 pm – 5:00 pm: “Energy Storage”, LARCHER Dominique, Professor LRCS, Amiens

 

Friday, March 23 (Amphitheater BOREAU – building C – 1st floor)

9:00 am – 10:00 am: Final examination session in the form of quizzes on the sessions

10:00 am – 11:00 am: Answers to the quizzes and concluding remarks

 

Thank you for your attendance to the sessions!

Annie Colin, Professor, International Relations Director, ESPCI. Tél: +33 1 40 79 46 83, Email: annie.colin@espci.fr

Bénédicte Ravier, Head of International Relations. Tél: +33 1 40 79 45 00, Email: international@espci.fr

Gloria Ndzila, ATHENS Local coordinator, ESPCI. Tél: +33 1 40 79 47 24, Email: gloria.ndzila@espci.fr

 

Prerequisites

The prerequisites of the courses are notions of solid physics, electrochemistry and basic mechanics.

The competences acquired during the lectures are: in-depth knowledge of the orders of magnitude on energy, basics on photovoltaics and wind, knowledge of photovoltaic-hydrogen conversion processes, knowledge of hydrogen storage materials, electrostrictive materials, piezoelectric devices, and energy storage.

The Course Notes will be made available to students on the ESPCI website one week before the beginning of the lectures.

It is strongly recommended to download them. For environmental reasons, no paper documents will be provided.

The classes will last 1H20 and will be separated by 20 minutes breaks.

Course exam

One hour final examination session in the form of quizzes on the sessions followed by a session with answers to the questions and concluding remarks.
Back